The mobile web sucks, but a great many websites aren't helping the cause

Nilay Patel's piece of the state of the mobile web. I agree with much of it.

Certainly I strongly agree with a point Patel only briefly touched up, which relates to Apple's iOS terms that explicitly prevent developers from bringing a custom web engine to the platform. I.e., Chrome is available for iOS, but Google are forced to use Apple's web rendering engine for displaying the web content. Google are explicitly forbidden from using Blink, their custom rendering engine that powers Chrome on all other platforms (including OS X) on iOS.

I think this restriction is egregious and overzealous on Apple's part, and absolutely harms the mobile web.

But by no means do I agree with all of Patel's piece.

Apps have become nearly irrelevant on desktops because the web experience is close to perfect, while apps are vitally important on phones because the web experience is dismal.

What the what? Certainly I'd agree it's conceivable we might be a path where desktop apps become nearly irrelevant, but by no means are we close to there yet.

Finally, this:

Flurry: app usage continues to rise at rather staggering rates

flurry_analytics.jpg

Simon Khalaf:

From Q2 2014 to Q2 2015, the total population of smart devices measured by Flurry grew from 1.3B to 1.8B, a 38% year over year growth. Regular Users, consumers who use apps between once and 16 times daily, grew from 784 million to 985 million in the same period, a 25% increase. Super Users, consumers who use apps between 16 and 60 times daily, grew even more in that same period from 440 million to 590 million, a 34% increase.

When we looked at Mobile Addicts, consumers who launch applications 60 times or more per day, we saw this group is growing at the fastest rate, from 176 million in Q2 2014 to a whopping 280 million in Q2 2015, a 59% increase.

There's obviously little question that we as a society are increasingly consumed by our mobile devies. 500 million devices coming online within a single year is pretty staggering (though I'd expect a great many of those would be additional screens for people who already made up the previous 1.3 billion total).

Sidenote: none of my apps have ever used Flurry, but the odds are pretty high one of the apps on your devices do.